Home » Asian-inspired! » Paleo & Keto Ramen (with shirataki noodles!) 🍜

Paleo & Keto Ramen (with shirataki noodles!) 🍜

Hearty, ultra flavorful and super duper warming, whipping up this paleo and keto ramen is simple enough to make it a stellar weeknight meal!

Eating keto ramen with shirataki noodles, beef and a soft boiled egg

Paleo & Keto Ramen 🍜

With shirataki noodles!

Before I say anything else, let’s go ahead and state the obvious: this is an “Americanized” version of ramen, with readily available paleo and keto pantry ingredients (perhaps to make matters even worse, oops!).

Still, just like americanized Mexican (i.e. Tex Mex) is delicious in its own right, I think you’ll find this keto ramen to be everything you expect: comforting, warming, hearty… and super duper flavorful!

Not to mention, easy peasy to customize to your needs (and taste buds!).

Paleo and keto ramen with shirataki noodles, beef and a soft boiled egg

The Shirataki Noodles

My one (vip!) top tip: find shirataki noodles you enjoy. I personally like this brand with added oat fiber) very much in Asian dishes. They’re muuuch better in my opinion to the original version: less chewy (hurray!) and no fishy smell (like whoaaa!). And browsing around amazon, they still seem to be consistently the highest rated brand of them all… and they’re organic. But if you’ve tried something better (pretty please!) always feel free to chime in.

Shirataki noodles, composed mostly of water and konjac yam (a water-soluble dietary fiber), are a popular ingredient in Japanese cuisine. They also go by other names: konjac noodles (from the plant they originate), miracle noodles (because of the most popular brand) or konnyaku noodles. What has them trending, however, is that they’re effectively zero calories and carbs.

What do they taste like? Shirataki noodles are actually taste-less and will take on the flavors of the dish. Texture-wise is where they vary, as they are more rubbery than your traditional noodles. And tbh, we’re not fans of using them outside the realms of Asian cuisine. But given that the rice noodles used in pad Thai are also on the chewy-side, shirataki noodles do work quite well here. And in our book, definitely worth a try.

So in order to get them ready, I think best to follow manufacturer’s instructions (albeit rinse for a little longer until the konjac plant aroma goes away). So it’s easy peasy: drain the noodles, rinse well in cold water, place in boiling water for two minutes, then dry the noodles in a non-oiled pan over medium heat.

You see, taking the extra time to prepare your noodles will ensure they soak through all the flavors in the dish.

The Ramen Add-Ins

While I have a real penchant for beef ramen, you can easily interchange it with chicken and even pork… not to mention the (literal!) myriad of veggies you can choose from. Still, let’s go through the staples:

  • a good bone broth: while I like to whip up my own (when I have time…!), I personally think the best store bought version out there is from Bonafide Provisions. You see, it’s legit frozen and gelatinous broth… because let’s face it, the versions you find in a carton aren’t really the real deal (slightly controversial opinion perhaps, but true nonetheless).
  • flavorful meat: while I went here for thin strips of beef (cooked in the broth itself), you can also go for chicken breasts or pork.
  • veggies: while I generally adore throwing in some shitake mushrooms with scallions, I sadly couldn’t get a hold of either (winter in Montana, alas!). So while I’ll more than gladly update this post with various versions in the future, I want to prove my point that ramen is so versatile that you really can use what’s in store or in your fridge (i.e. I went for some sprouts…. and parsley, don’t @ me lol!).
  • for flavor: the few things that I’ll say are kind of non negotiable are fresh ginger, sesame oil (a toasted version if you can find it is even better), fish sauce*, and soy sauce (coconut aminos** or tamari if gluten free).

*I know, I know. Fish sauce literally smells like fertilizer, but it’s also utterly delicious in not just asian dishes… but to give insane umami to even the most unexpected dishes, say bolognese (seriously, don’t knock it till you try it!).

**If using coconut aminos pretty please use half the amount as its muuuch saltier.

Taking keto shirataki noodles in a ramen soup with chop sticks

Looking for more Asian inspired keto recipes?! Don’t (I repeat don’t!) miss out on my keto pad thai and orange chicken. 😉

Paleo and keto ramen with shirataki noodles, beef and a soft boiled egg

Paleo & Keto Ramen (with shirataki noodles!)

Hearty, ultra flavorful and super duper warming, whipping up this paleo and keto ramen is simple enough to make it a stellar weeknight meal!
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Total Time 30 mins
Course Main
Cuisine Asian
Servings 4
Calories 437 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 2 packages shirataki noodles
  • 1 lb boneless sirloin steak sliced into thin strips 2-3 inches wide, on the bias
  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
  • 3 cloves garlic minced or ran through a press
  • 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
  • 3 tablespoons tamari or 1 1/2 tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar or 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 6 cups beef bone broth chicken or pork work great too
  • 1 oz shitake mushrooms or bean sprouts

To serve:

  • 4 soft boiled eggs
  • 3 scallions sliced (or parsley, if all else fails)
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes to taste

Instructions
 

  • Prepare the shirataki noodles: I think best to follow manufacturer’s instructions (albeit rinse for a little longer until the konjac plant aroma goes away). So it’s easy peasy: drain the noodles, rinse well in cold water, place in boiling water for two minutes, then dry the noodles in a non-oiled pan over medium heat. Set aside. 
  • Prepare your meat: you can either do as I did and cook the thinly sliced strips of beef in the broth at the end, or melt a little butter in a skillet (or Dutch oven) over medium heat and cook the steak itself (or chicken breast) and slice after. Either work great, it's your choice. Also if you're using fresh mushrooms (rather than dried), go ahead and sautée them in the skillet after cooking your meat. Set aside while you prepare the broth.
  • Make the ramen broth: heat up the sesame oil in a dutch oven or pot over medium heat. Add in garlic, ginger and sautée briefly until it just starts to brown. Add in the tamari, vinegar and fish sauce and simmer for a minute or so. Add the broth and dried mushrooms and simmer for 10 minutes. Taste for seasoning and feel free to add a little salt if need be (will depend on your broth itself!). If cooking your beef in the broth, you want to do so now: dip the thin strips in the broth until nice and brown. Remove and set aside.
  • Assemble your ramen by adding in your shirataki noodles and simmer for a couple more minutes. Divide among four bowls, top with your beef, mushrooms (or fresh bean sprouts), soft boiled eggs and scallions. Enjoy right away!

Notes

The Ramen Add-Ins

My one (vip!) top tip: find shirataki noodles you enjoy. I personally like this brand with added oat fiber) very much in Asian dishes. They’re muuuch better in my opinion to the original version: less chewy (hurray!) and no fishy smell (like whoaaa!). And browsing around amazon, they still seem to be consistently the highest rated brand of them all… and they’re organic. But if you’ve tried something better (pretty please!) always feel free to chime in.
While I have a real penchant for beef ramen, you can easily interchange it with chicken and even pork. Still, let's go through the staples:
  • a good bone broth: while I like to whip up my own (when I have time...!), I personally think the best store bought version out there is from Bonafide Provisions. You see, it's legit frozen and gelatinous broth... because let's face it, the versions you find in a carton aren't really the real deal (slightly controversial opinion perhaps, but true nonetheless). 
  • flavorful meat: while I went here for thin strips of beef (cooked in the broth itself), you can also go for chicken breasts or pork. 
  • veggies: while I generally adore throwing in some shitake mushrooms with scallions, I sadly couldn't get a hold of either (winter in Montana, alas!). So while I'll more than gladly update this post with various versions in the future, I want to prove my point that ramen is so versatile that you really can use what's in store or in your fridge (i.e. I went for some sprouts.... and parsley, don't @ me lol!).  
  • for flavor: the few things that I'll say are kind of non negotiable are fresh ginger, sesame oil (a toasted version if you can find it is even better), fish sauce*, and soy sauce (coconut aminos** or tamari if gluten free). 
*I know, I know. Fish sauce literally smells like fertilizer, but it's also utterly delicious in not just asian dishes... but to give insane umami to even the most unexpected dishes, say bolognese (seriously, don't knock it till you try it!). 
**If using coconut aminos pretty please use half the amount as its muuuch saltier. 

Nutrition

Serving: 1bowl | Calories: 437kcal | Carbohydrates: 8g | Protein: 45g | Fat: 16g | Saturated Fat: 8g | Cholesterol: 415mg | Sodium: 840mg | Potassium: 173mg | Fiber: 8g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 240IU | Vitamin C: 8.6mg | Calcium: 170mg | Iron: 3mg
Keyword keto ramen, paleo ramen, shirataki noodle ramen
Whip up this recipe?Comment below or drop me a line @gnomgnom._ and tag #gnomgnomyum!

3 comments

  1. Jeni Michelson says:

    I agree that shiritaki with oat fiber has better texture! I thought it was vile and never wanted to eat it again after first trying it. Things are improving and I’ve been able to eat shiritaki spaghetti and rice. The Liviva Brand is really good and has zero smell, ready to eat out of the bag. Another interesting option is kelp noodles. An Asian friend told me to soak them in lemon, baking soda water solution and it’s magical! In 7 minutes it transforms from a semi-rigid texture to a silky slippery noodle with the texture of angel hair pasta. Just rinse and they are wonderful! They look like glass noodles but only 6 carbs 18 calories for a 12oz package. They don’t put this important technique on the package which is unfortunate. You can’t microwave or stir fry them in a hot pan, but cold sesame kelp noodles are amazing and you put piping hot sauces on them with no problem. Enjoy! From a recovering pasta freak lol! I love your site and bought your Gnooda pasta since you went to market!

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