Gnom Gnom Bakery http://www.gnom-gnom.com Gluten Free Bakery Mexico City | Panadería Gluten Free Distrito Federal Mon, 12 Jun 2017 00:22:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.10 lemon verbena blueberry galette http://www.gnom-gnom.com/lemon-verbena-blueberry-galette-recipe/ http://www.gnom-gnom.com/lemon-verbena-blueberry-galette-recipe/#comments Mon, 13 Jul 2015 19:18:36 +0000 http://www.gnom-gnom.com/?p=1278           lemon verbena blueberry galette. Mexico City (aka DF) is beautiful, but lets just say that summer weather is not its forte. Because our seasons are divided into dry and rainy, which makes temperature fairly constant all year round (thank goodness!), in summer we pay the consequences and live through a …

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lemon verbena blueberry galette | gnom-gnom.com
 
blueberries | gnom-gnom.com
 
lemon verbena blueberry galette | gnom-gnom.com
 
blueberries | gnom-gnom.com
 
lemon verbena blueberry galette | gnom-gnom.com
 
lemon verbena blueberry galette. Mexico City (aka DF) is beautiful, but lets just say that summer weather is not its forte. Because our seasons are divided into dry and rainy, which makes temperature fairly constant all year round (thank goodness!), in summer we pay the consequences and live through a few months of wetness and fairly chilly afternoons. Think torrential rains (I am not talking about the London drizzle, but rather the ‘you stand outside for a minute even with an umbrella and are soaked’ type of rain), hail (yups hail!), and the occasional thunderstorm. To be fair it can be pretty spectacular, and make for some great tardes chocolateras (direct translation: chocolate afternoons, aka stay in, hide under a blanket, watch a movie, and sip some Mexican hot chocolate).

So while you guys in America are all about your summer pies and galettes for picnics, I’m feeling them more for those cold ‘n wet afternoons. To be devoured with a glass of almond milk or a cuppa tea.

And such is the story of this lemon verbena blueberry galette. The result of bringing home 1kg (over 2 pounds!) of local organic blueberries back on Saturday from the market. Which the mother and I devoured pretty much in one go. Starting shyly slice by slice (with the excuse that it wasn’t going to be as good the next day…) and managed to take down three quarters of it in one sitting. So yes, it is that good. And you can easily manage that (good thing?), because of the freshness in flavors- both of the filling and of the crust.

The blueberries are nicely accentuated by the lemon verbena (known as cedrón here in Mexico), a nice tip I got at the market. And similarly, the lemon rind in the crust gives the whole thing even more of that kick (and makes eating just the crust rather delectable). In my book, baking with spices generally results in much more complex flavors, and (just as in cooking) can be adjusted to taste. So feel free to mock around to your taste buds desires.

Now let’s talk a tiny bit about the cooking time for this blueberry galette. Around the net, and talking to people, you may notice that they vary from 20 minutes up to even 45 (which is quite a difference for pretty much the same recipe). Your crust should be ready at around 20 minutes once its a nice golden brown, so after that I always suggest you cover it (only the crust) with aluminum foil. And regarding the cooking time? I think it is about preference and about the state of your blueberries so keep an eye on them after minute 20. If you want them fresh and not fully popped take it out close to marker 20 and if you want it more fully cooked and dense closer to marker 40. I cooked mine for 35 minutes this time, but generally go for 30 as I prefer it a tad bit fresher. And regarding the cooking temperature, I suggest you cook this guy at 190°C/375°F (rather than 200°C/390°F, which may be more customary for pies), the blueberries will thank you.

Also, hold your horses for this one and allow it to cool (at least to room temperature) before digging in to allow the flavors to settle. Oh, and this guy can be made the day before, just make sure you store it in a (super) air tight container at room temp.

Lemon Verbena Blueberry Galette
Author: 
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 1 galette
 
Ingredients
The Pastry
  • 185 g (1½ cup) gluten free flour mix*
  • ½ tsp xanthan gum**
  • 1 TBS evaporated cane juice (or cane sugar)
  • rind of one lemon
  • a pinch of salt
  • 125 g (1 stick plus 1TBS) very cold butter, cut into pieces
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 2-4 TBS ice cold water (I use 3)
Lemon Verbena & Blueberry Filling
  • 500g (about 3 cups) blueberries (fresh are best, but frozen won't hurt!)
  • 1.5 TBS cornstarch
  • 50g (about ¼ cup) evaporated cane juice (or cane sugar)
  • 2 tsp fresh lemon juice
  • 10 to 15 fresh lemon verbena leaves, chopped
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten for egg wash (optional)
Instructions
The Pastry
  1. For the gluten free pastry, place the flour mix, xanthan gum, sugar, lemon rind, and salt into a food processor and pulse a couple of times. Add the butter and egg and pulse a few more times (you do not want to overprocess it as it will lose flakiness). Add 1 tablespoon at a time of freezing cold water until the dough just comes together (I usually just add three).
  2. On a flat surface incorporate into a ball, flatten, wrap in cling film and refrigerate for at least one hour.
Lemon Verbena & Blueberry Filling
  1. Once ready to bake, preheat the oven to 190°C (375°F).
  2. In a bowl mix with a whisk the cornstarch and cane juice.
  3. Toss in the blueberries, mix thoroughly with the lemon juice and the lemon verbena leaves.
  4. Roll out the dough to a 12" round and transfer to a parchment lined baking sheet (will make the blueberry juice cleanup much easier, trust me!).
  5. Place the blueberry mixture in the center, leaving a 2" border. Fold the edges in, overlapping slightly. Brush with egg wash (you may want to brush inside the folded edges to make sure they stick as well).
  6. Bake for 30 minutes or once the blueberries are bubbling slightly. But place aluminum foil over crust at minute 20 or once it is golden brown. See post above for baking timing discussion.
  7. Hold your horses and allow to cool to room temperature before digging in.
  8. Can be baked one day ahead and stored in an air tight container at room temperature.
Notes
*for pie crusts I favor gluten free mixes with garbanzo bean, such as Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free All Purpose Baking Flour. And I find that with the lemon rind there is absolutely no 'bean' taste and the texture is wonderful. Alternatively try Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour and abstain from adding any xanthan gum.

**only include the xanthan gum if your gluten free flour mix does not contain xanthan gum

 

 

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banana ‘n cardamom chocolate chip cookies http://www.gnom-gnom.com/gluten-free-banana-cardamom-chocolate-chip-cookies-recipe/ http://www.gnom-gnom.com/gluten-free-banana-cardamom-chocolate-chip-cookies-recipe/#comments Fri, 10 Jul 2015 16:40:05 +0000 http://www.gnom-gnom.com/?p=1251         banana ‘n cardamom chocolate chip cookies. This is a cookie with all good ingredients (yes, I count good quality dark chocolate as good… at least in moderation ;)!), and with flavors unique enough not to rival the classic chocolate chip cookie (which in my book, I’m sorry to say it ought …

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gluten free banana 'n cardamom chocolate chip cookies | gnom-gnom.com
 
gluten free banana 'n cardamom chocolate chip cookies | gnom-gnom.com
 
chocolate | gnom-gnom.com
 
gluten free banana 'n cardamom chocolate chip cookies | gnom-gnom.com
 
banana ‘n cardamom chocolate chip cookies. This is a cookie with all good ingredients (yes, I count good quality dark chocolate as good… at least in moderation ;)!), and with flavors unique enough not to rival the classic chocolate chip cookie (which in my book, I’m sorry to say it ought to be made with butter in order to achieve perfection).

Cardamom, banana and chocolate is a match made in heaven if there ever was one. Just a hint of cardamom will help to accentuate the banana in a nice subtle (non-sweet) way, perfect if you want to spiff up that classic tried through-and-through banana bread recipe. These guys are moist (in the best of ways), chewy, and veering on the soft scone-cake side of the cookie spectrum (aka they will never be your thin crisp cookies).

Oh, and if you are looking for an extra crunch I like to add every so often grated (or slivers) of dried coconut. #gnomgnom

So you know those summer afternoons when you have already had your fair share of pie (and hence butter), these will hit the spot just right. Or alternatively, if you are reading this in winter, omit the coconut, and you’ve got one heck of a cookie to balance out all your winter baking. It is a win win situation as you can see.

gluten free banana 'n cardamom chocolate chip cookies | gnom-gnom.com

Now, I’ve yet to come across a cookie that doesn’t contain at least a hint of butter or an insane amount of almond butter (basically all almond butter) that spreads by itself (if you have a recipe please do enlighten me!). So you have two options for these guys: you can either place them in the oven as balls and flatten them out with a spatula after 4 mins (for the more rustic look in the first pictures), or you can shape them as you wish pre-baking (white picture). The texture is not affected, it just depends on whether you are say a ‘galette or pie’ sort of gal.

These guys are definitely gluten and dairy free, and I’ve got nothing against eggs, but if you want to make them vegan simply substitute with a chia egg (I have and they work great, just come out a tad bit more dense). Also, I highly suggest that you make your almond butter at home, it really isn’t that hard and you will save a truck load of $ in the long short run.

Otherwise, make sure that you absolutely (and I mean absolutely) wait until these guys cool down completely before digging in. I know that you won’t listen to me and eat half of the batch just out of the oven (as any sane person would), but then you will try them once cool and you will know exactly what I am talking about now.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Gluten Free Banana 'n Cardamom Chocolate Chip Cookies
Author: 
Recipe type: Cookies
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 10
 
Ingredients
  • 200g gluten free flour mix*
  • ½ tsp xanthan gum**
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp (scant) sea salt
  • 1 tsp ground cardamom (you might want to use ½ to ¾tsp if freshly ground)
  • 30g evaporated cane juice
  • 50g dark brown sugar
  • 25g agave nectar
  • 1 egg
  • 160g almond butter
  • 1 very ripe banana, smashed (about 100g)
  • 75g chocolate chips
  • 90g chocolate chunks
  • 30g dry coconut slices or rind (optional)
Instructions
  1. Whisk together very thoroughly your gluten free flour with the xanthan gum (if needed), baking soda, sea salt (here we are talking of 1tsp of the one that is slightly chunky, if yours is super fine use ¼ tsp). Put aside.
  2. Whisk together the evaporated cane juice with the dark brown sugar. Add the almond butter and cream with an electric mixture on medium until thoroughly incorporated (I would say 3 to 4 minutes).
  3. Incorporate the agave nectar and mix until just combined, do the same with the egg and the banana.
  4. Add half of your dry ingredient mixture and continue to mix on medium, and the other half and mix until just incorporated.
  5. Fold in the chocolate chips and chunks (they melt at different temperatures, so they give the cookie a lovely consistency) and the dry coconut (if using). Form into a ball in the center of the ball as much as you can (it's sticky), cover the bowl with cling film and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.
  6. Preheat oven to 180°C/355°F in the meantime. Take out your dough and spoon out (small) lemon-sized quantities of the dough unto a parchment lined baking sheet. You can either flatten them and shape them slightly now or 4 minutes into baking.
  7. Place in the oven and bake for 8-10 minutes just golden but tender to touch. I suggest rotating the tray halfway through baking, and if you did not shape them before, this is when you should take your spatula and flatten them for a nice rustic look.
  8. Now this is where it gets tough (and I learned my lesson with the first batch), you must allow them to cool completely. Because of the cardamom, these cookies (believe it or not!) are best once they have cooled down completely. Shocker I know.
  9. Enjoy with a nice glass of almond milk on the side. Boom.
Notes
*Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free 1-to-1 works great for this recipe (omit the xanthan gum). Alternatively, my home made mix is:
1 cup sorghum flour (can be substituted by white rice flour)
3/4 cup brown rice flour
3/4 cup tapioca flour/starch
1/2 cup potato flour (can be substituted by sweet rice flour)

Note that when substituting flours in gluten free flour mixes, always substitute by volume (cups) rather than weight (grams).
Weigh out 200g and keep the rest for another recipe.

** If your gluten free flour mix has xanthan gum, do not add any more

In order to make these guys non gluten free, substitute the gluten-free flour mix for unbleached flour and omit the xanthan gum

 

 

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homemade almond butter http://www.gnom-gnom.com/homemade-almond-butter-recipe/ http://www.gnom-gnom.com/homemade-almond-butter-recipe/#comments Thu, 09 Jul 2015 17:08:09 +0000 http://www.gnom-gnom.com/?p=1222       homemade almond butter. Are you absolutely tired of grimacing every time you hit the almond butter section? I mean I get that its organic, that it has nuggets of heaven, and that its processed by the very almond gods… but churning out fifteen bucks (!!) or so every couple of weeks or …

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homemade almond butter recipe | gnom-gnom.com
 
homemade almond butter recipe | gnom-gnom.com
 
homemade almond butter recipe | gnom-gnom.com
 
homemade almond butter. Are you absolutely tired of grimacing every time you hit the almond butter section? I mean I get that its organic, that it has nuggets of heaven, and that its processed by the very almond gods… but churning out fifteen bucks (!!) or so every couple of weeks or so, well that just doesn’t cut it. And for me it’s not just that, but packing it in my suitcase and smuggling it cross-border down south. To to be fair it’s perfectly legal, but you should see the faces the times I’ve gotten that dreaded red light at the stop light at the Mexican customs (if you’ve been over here you know exactly what I’m talking about). Between clothes (and shoes, loads of shoes…) are precious packages of gluten free flours still foreign over here (I mean how hard is it to import sorghum people?! get with it!), maple syrup (grade A), and various flavors of almond butter (honey being my favorite)… amongst other wholefood-ish stuff. You get the drift.

So this time I came home (and I honestly don’t know what took me so long… I’m going to blame it on being super duper busy with my fine jewelry business), it had to be done at home. Although perhaps the deterrents are the infinite number of horror stories you hear and read out there. Broken food processors, carton dry almond butter worthy of no one, hour long processes… only to end up adding a cup of peanut oil in the end.

Well let me tell you something. It’s actually damn easy. But there are two key things involved.

Fresh almonds (numero uno!). I mean you can churn and churn all you want, but if you start with bad produce you are not going to get a jar worth fifteen bucks. Know what I mean? So make sure your almonds have not been laying out there or in a warehouse for years.

Now for requirement numero dos. While you don’t have to toast your almonds, you should at the very least get them in a pan and warm them up a bit. This will speed up the process and make sure you are done in fifteen mins or so. Sounds good right?

Read on.

Ah-OK. So let’s let started. In terms of ingredients we are talking about one: almonds. Specially if you want to use your almond butter for something else (may I suggest cookies?!). Otherwise you can get fancy, and I always suggest adding a touch of (great quality) sea salt to taste and you can always add a bit of honey, maple syrup or agave nectar.

And in terms of quantities I prefer to make a small batch every so often (say two weeks). So I make about two cups (180g) which ends up being approximately 2/3 cup… although to be fair I have never put it back into a cup as I always bake and cook in grams and well (and well, the weight does stay the same).

Also, make sure to give your food processor a quick break every few minutes or so because well, you don’t want to send it off to a better place. And it will also allow you to incorporate any stray almonds from the walls and lid of the food processor back into the mixture.

Homemade Almond Butter
Author: 
Recipe type: Spreads
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
 
Ingredients
Absolutely Necessary
  • 280g (2 cups) almonds
Optional
  • (great quality) fine sea salt
  • maple syrup, honey (my personal favorite), or agave nectar
  • I suppose you can also add cacao (never tried, not my cup of tea)
Instructions
  1. Place almonds in a pan and lightly toast until just warm (if you do not want raw almond butter keep going until they get some color, otherwise heating them up a bit is enough to get them going)
  2. Get them into the food processor immediately and process in the lowest setting, taking a break every few minutes or so.
  3. At around minute 8 (counting the respiratory breaks), a ball should begin to form (just around the time when you thought it would never happen right?). Keep going until it is super smooooth.
  4. Now give it a bit of a taste. If you are using the almond butter for something else I suggest leaving it alone, otherwise you may want to add a touch (be light here, you can always add more!) of fine sea salt to bring out the flavors.
  5. Place in an air tight container and keep in the fridge (I suggest). It will keep for two weeks (some people say for up to a month, and it probably will but I have never tried it).

 

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kale & ricotta pasta http://www.gnom-gnom.com/kale-ricotta-pasta-recipe/ http://www.gnom-gnom.com/kale-ricotta-pasta-recipe/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 15:09:51 +0000 http://www.gnom-gnom.com/?p=1214   kale & ricotta pasta. Got 20 minutes? OK guys, this is a super easy recipe. So easy, that I am sure many of you even have most of the ingredients already in your fridge. Will you own up to having some kale in your fridge overstaying its welcome? Well this recipe will put that …

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kale & ricotta pasta. Got 20 minutes? OK guys, this is a super easy recipe. So easy, that I am sure many of you even have most of the ingredients already in your fridge. Will you own up to having some kale in your fridge overstaying its welcome? Well this recipe will put that kale to perfect use.

I do most of the cooking around the house, and this kale and ricotta pasta recipe (and its variations, see below), is part of my stuck-in-Mexico-City-traffic-need-to-eat-asap once I get home routine. Having said that, I would still serve them to friends at a casual dinner party (and I have).

And yes peeps, this is a gluten free blog! But nowadays who says that us celiacs cannot indulge in a good old pasta? My favourites are those made entirely out of brown rice (perhaps not the healthiest given the recent findings that there is a higher arsenic content in brown rice than white…but it is the only gf pasta which I have found that never disintegrates, no matter the sauce). Quinoa, corn and so on gf pastas might be great on the health level (and I do eat them quite a bit), but with raw sauces to avoid a mush catastrophe (more of that to come at a later post).

Now, in terms of quantities, this recipe adapts well. If you love your kale, just add more. If you love your garlic (me!), add more. Got some salmon? Grill it and add it on top. Catch my drift?

Don’t forget that kale loves a touch of lemon, particularly if there is salmon involved that day. And if you are not too big on citrus, a decent dose of lemon grind will do. Oh, and if you like it extra cheesy (can I say me again?) add a touch of Parmiggiano Reggiano on top (please go the extra mile here and avoid the American ‘parmesan cheese’… your palates will thank you).

Do yourself the favour of becoming addicted to this pasta.


Kale & Ricotta Pasta
Author: 
Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Italian
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 2
 
Ingredients
  • 2 TBS grapeseed oil (or cooking oil of choice)
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely minced (or put through a press)
  • 12 pecans, roughly chopped
  • 225 g (1/2 pound) kale, roughly chopped
  • 2 tsp finely grated lemon zest + lemon juice (to taste)
  • 2 TBS minced parsley
  • ¼ cup ricotta
  • 1 TBS olive oil
  • Parmesan to taste
  • 200 g pasta of choice (I like to use a gluten free brown rice spaguetti or fettucine)
Instructions
  1. Boil water for pasta.
  2. While pasta is cooking, mix together the ricotta, lemon zest and parsley in a bowl. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and set aside.
  3. Heat pan for kale with grapeseed oil. Add minced garlic and sauté briefly, add pecans and continue stir around until golden. Add kale and continue to sauté until leaves just begin to soften (about two to three minutes). We want them to still have some texture.
  4. When pasta is cooked al dente (see timing instructions on package but check a minute before indicated time), drain pasta and toss into the pan with the kale. If the kale is done before remove it from the heat (preferable than having an overcooked vegetable). Mix it well with some olive oil and add the ricotta mixture. Toss it around rapidly without over-mixing, add some Parmesan, and serve at once.

 

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(vegan ‘n gluten free) salted chocolate tarts http://www.gnom-gnom.com/vegan-salted-chocolate-tarts/ http://www.gnom-gnom.com/vegan-salted-chocolate-tarts/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 13:00:17 +0000 http://www.gnom-gnom.com/?p=362       (vegan & gluten free) salted chocolate tarts. If I had to describe these (salted) chocolate tarts in just one word, awesome would be it. These (rather decadent) chocolate tarts are proof that flavour need not be sacrificed for the sake of healthier ingredients. The filling is rich and smooth, definitely leaving you …

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(vegan & gluten free) salted chocolate tarts | gnom-gnom.com
 
(vegan & gluten free) salted chocolate tarts | gnom-gnom.com
 
(vegan & gluten free) salted chocolate tarts | gnom-gnom.com
 
(vegan & gluten free) salted chocolate tarts. If I had to describe these (salted) chocolate tarts in just one word, awesome would be it.

These (rather decadent) chocolate tarts are proof that flavour need not be sacrificed for the sake of healthier ingredients. The filling is rich and smooth, definitely leaving you to wonder about the whole vegan part of the equation. And the hazelnut and thyme pairing of the crust is well, just divine.

With winter comes a bit of decadence, and these chocolate tarts definitely fit the mould. I personally like to use pure cacao paste, but the next best thing would be 99% cacao chocolate (Lindt makes it). Also, while the ground chia seeds may seem unimportant- do not omit them, as they are what binds the whole thing together.

And hey, if hazelnuts are not your thing, just do the tartlet cases all almond. But I personally love the hazelnut-chocolate combo (hint hint! Nutella). I also like to make these tartlets as a 50-50 chocolate-filling-to-hazelnut-crust ratio, but feel free to play around. These are no chocolate soufflé, so feel free to adjust ratios such as sweetness a bit according to taste.

Just do not forget to sprinkle a touch of great quality salt right before serving (I favour Maldon), or a pink himalayan will work great as well.

p.s. the chocolate filling is also pretty amazing on (warm) toast. Fairly similar in taste to the Dutch hagelslag (chocolate sprinkles).


(vegan & gluten free) Salted Chocolate Tarts
Author: 
Recipe type: Dessert
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4 x 9 cm tartlets
 
Ingredients
For the hazelnut crust (adapted from Elana Amsterdam's The Gluten-Free Almond Flour Cookbook)
  • ¾ cup hazelnut flour
  • 1½ cup almond flour
  • ¼ tsp fine sea salt
  • 2 TBS fresh thyme, minced (optional, but highly suggested)
  • ⅓ cup + 1 TBS grapeseed oil
  • 1 TBS water
For the chocolate filling
  • 200 g (7 oz) cacao paste (or 99% cacao chocolate)
  • ¾ cup coconut milk
  • ¾ cup almond milk
  • 1 TBS chia seeds, ground
  • 2 TBS coconut oil
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2-3 TBS agave nectar (to taste)
To garnish
  • a few pinches of high quality salt (I use Maldon) to garnish before serving
Instructions
Make the tartlet cases
  1. To make the tartlet cases, preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). Place the hazelnut flour, almond flour, salt and thyme in a bowl and whisk to thoroughly combine. Add the grapeseed oil and water and combine. Press the dough into the tartlet cases and bake for 10-15 minutes, or until golden brown. Allow to cool completely.
Make the chocolate filling
  1. To make the chocolate filling, break the cacao paste into pieces and place in a large bowl. Set aside. Place the coconut milk, almond milk, ground chia seeds, coconut oil and vanilla extract in a saucepan over medium heat. Just as it begins to boil, pour over the cacao paste and let stand for about 10 minutes, or until the solids have melted. Incorporate the agave nectar to taste (I use 2 TBS).
Assemble
  1. Pour over hazelnut tartlet cases, allow to cool completely and refrigerate for 3 hours, or until completely set. Serve with a pinch of good quality sea salt.
Notes
Hazelnut flour can be hard to find- so to make, you can place hazelnuts in a baking sheet and bake for 10-15 minutes at 180°C (350°F), rub off the skins and place in a food processor. Pulse until ground (but be careful to not overprocess as hazelnut butter will result). Otherwise Bob's Red Mill makes a great one.

 

 

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(gluten free) buckwheat pancakes http://www.gnom-gnom.com/gluten-free-buckwheat-pancakes-recipe/ http://www.gnom-gnom.com/gluten-free-buckwheat-pancakes-recipe/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 03:35:29 +0000 http://www.gnom-gnom.com/?p=1071   (gluten free) buckwheat pancakes. These guys are undoubtedly my pancake staple. Way (way) better than the common ground pancakes- plus, they are pretty healthy. Fluffy and full of flavour, it is hard to believe these are gluten free (no one I’ve served them to can). Plus, they can become vegan by substituting the eggs …

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(gluten free) buckwheat pancakes. These guys are undoubtedly my pancake staple. Way (way) better than the common ground pancakes- plus, they are pretty healthy. Fluffy and full of flavour, it is hard to believe these are gluten free (no one I’ve served them to can).

Plus, they can become vegan by substituting the eggs with chia eggs (ground chia soaked in water) and by substituting the yoghurt with a little extra almond milk. Do note, however, that they always come out fluffier when made with eggs rather than chia. Substituting the yoghurt is no biggie.

Add sliced bananas, blueberries (my favourite), and most definitely (good quality) maple syrup.

(gluten free) buckwheat pancakes

1 cup buckwheat flour
1 cup brown rice flour
2 tsp baking powder
1 1/2 tsp baking soda
pinch fine sea salt
1/3 cup yoghurt (full fat preferably)
1/2 – 3/4 cup almond milk (add little by little)
2 eggs, lightly beaten
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 TBS maple syrup
1 cup blueberries or a couple of sliced bananas (optional)

coconut or grapeseed oil (or cooking oil of choice)
maple syrup to serve

Whisk together the dry ingredients in a large bowl until thoroughly combined (buckwheat flour, brown rice flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt). In a separate bowl whisk together the liquid ingredients (yoghurt, 1/2 cup almond milk, eggs, vanilla extract and maple syrup).

Add the wet mixture to the dry and mix until just incorporated (do not over-mix, as it will result in tough pancakes). If needed (depends on brand flours used), you may need to add a bit more almond milk so the pancake batter is the right consistency (not too runny, but liquid enough to pour into the pan).

Cover the pancake batter with cling film and allow to rest for 10 minutes (important).

Heat up your pan and add coconut oil, grapeseed oil (or cooking oil of choice) and I (highly) suggest adding the blueberries or banana slices to each individual pancake right after you have poured the batter into the pan.

Serves 4

 

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fresh egg pasta http://www.gnom-gnom.com/fresh-egg-pasta-recipe/ http://www.gnom-gnom.com/fresh-egg-pasta-recipe/#comments Fri, 11 Jan 2013 16:44:47 +0000 http://www.gnom-gnom.com/?p=971     fresh egg pasta (pasta fresca all’uovo). I love pasta. And since making it fresh, I kinda love it even more. Plus, making your own pasta at home is actually easier than you might think, even sans the pasta machine. There are several recipes out there with various ratios of flour to eggs (and …

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fresh egg pasta | gnom-gnom.com
 
fresh egg pasta | gnom-gnom.com
 
fresh egg pasta (pasta fresca all’uovo). I love pasta. And since making it fresh, I kinda love it even more. Plus, making your own pasta at home is actually easier than you might think, even sans the pasta machine.

There are several recipes out there with various ratios of flour to eggs (and some even adding olive oil), but the traditional way is simply ‘un uovo per ogni etto di farina‘- a.k.a, 1 egg to 100 g of flour (preferably the Italian type ’00’). The dough is stiff, so it requires sweating a drop or two when kneading, but the result is well worth the effort.

And hey, without the pasta machine to unroll all it requires is a bit of time (15-20 minutes worth) and more skill than force.

400 g (14.1 oz) Tipo ‘00’ flour
4 large eggs
1/2 tsp fine sea salt
semolina flour for dusting

Put the flour on a working table and make a well in the centre. Add the eggs and salt, and with a fork begin to break the eggs and gradually incorporate the surrounding flour. Once the eggs have a more solid consistency, you can begin to work the dough with your hands until well incorporated. (Or just dump it all into your food processor from the beginning). The dough will be rather hard, but knead it with force until smooth and elastic to develop the gluten (about 15 minutes).

Wrap in cling film and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes (it will make it easier to stretch). If you will be rolling the pasta without a machine, I suggest dividing the dough in two at this point, as it is much easier to work in small batches.

To unroll the pasta with a pin, dust a spacious work surface with semolina flour. You want to apply pressure when rolling away from you and easing the pressure when the rolling pin comes back to you. Work like this, rotating and turning over the dough until you can pretty much see print clearly through it (about 15-20 minutes).

If you are unrolling with a pasta machine, work from the widest setting to the narrowest, dusting both sides of the pasta every time.

Cut into your desired shape as soon as possible and allow to dry. To do so you can either roll it into a tube and cut in the desired width, or with a ruler (more time consuming).

serves 4

 

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rosca de reyes http://www.gnom-gnom.com/rosca-de-reyes-recipe/ http://www.gnom-gnom.com/rosca-de-reyes-recipe/#comments Fri, 04 Jan 2013 15:00:51 +0000 http://www.gnom-gnom.com/?p=986       rosca de reyes. It is a fact that certain foods remind us all of magical moments in our childhoods, and rosca de reyes does just that for me. Traditionally eaten on the 6th of January to commemorate the Three Kings, the rosca came along with a large meal, presents, and a good …

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rosca de reyes | gnom-gnom
 
rosca de reyes | gnom-gnom
 
rosca de reyes | gnom-gnom.com
 
rosca de reyes. It is a fact that certain foods remind us all of magical moments in our childhoods, and rosca de reyes does just that for me. Traditionally eaten on the 6th of January to commemorate the Three Kings, the rosca came along with a large meal, presents, and a good deal of laughter in finding the baby Jesus figurine.

The rosca de reyes (known as roscón over in Spain), is a tradition which dates back to the Roman times. And while nowadays it is associated associated with Epiphany (Dia de Reyes or King’s Day), back then it is thought to have been to celebrate the God of Saturn. A dry bean was hidden inside a round cake and whoever had the fortune of stumbling upon such bean was named “king of the feast”. The tradition was then carried on into France (where it is known as gâteau des Rois), and subsequently adopted in Spain.

The faba (or dry) bean was replaced for a figurine of baby Jesus as the tradition was absorbed into Christianity, to symbolise that the boy had to be hidden in order to be kept from harm during such period.

In Spain nowadays, however, there are two trinkets hidden in each roscón– a figurine (baby Jesus or some other toy) and a dry faba bean. And whoever finds the figurine gets crowned king or queen of the banquet, while whoever finds the faba bean must buy next year’s roscón.

Meanwhile, in Mexico you will find only figurines of baby Jesus inside the roscas (traditionally just one… but nowadays even four in the larger ones), and whoever gets one will need to buy the tamales on February 2nd for the Día de la Candelaria. Count on us mexicans to prolong the fiesta.

There are numerous (close to countless) of ways to make a rosca de reyes, depending on country, region, and of course taste. You can find them plain, filled with pastry cream or nata, even a few chocolate ones here and there… but my favourite is with candied fruits and raisins. And unlike the panettone (to which it is generally compared to), the rosca is more moist and need not rise as much.

This recipe is an amalgamation of the rosca found in Diane Kennedy’s The Art of Mexican Cooking and a few tips from talking with some panaderos (Mexican bakers). The general urge of the latter was that milk (rather than water) ought to be used, as it results in a creamier and denser crumb. And of course, a good rind of orange and Mexican lemon (green lime) is a must.

Variations also come with how to give form to the rosca. Diane advocates for either rolling into a coil and uniting the edges or simply making a hole in the middle of the dough and stretching out unto a circle (and the figurines are subsequently pushed from the bottom). Tradition in Mexico, however, dictates that the dough ought to be flattened with a pin into a long rectangle, the figurines scattered and the dough then rolled width-wise (trapping the figurines) to make a long coil- which is subsequently shaped as a loose rectangle (rather than a perfect circle). We also place some costrón (a sugary coating used also for the Mexican conchas), on the four corners of the rosca (thought to originally symbolise the four cardinal points to guide the Three Kings in their journey). Either way, the costrón is generally the most ‘fought’ for part of the rosca.

The results of this recipe really are excellent both when doing it old school by hand or with your Kitchen Aid. Do use the best quality ingredients for this recipe as you will really taste them (going organic for the butter and eggs in particular will make a total difference). Also, use only the best quality candied fruits (I make mine at home)- as most of the candied orange and stuff you buy in supermarkets is anything but fruit anymore. The result will be a deliciously moist rosca, with a fragrant orange scent.
 

 
rosca de reyes | gnom-gnom.com
 
Rosca de Reyes
(loosely adapted from The Art of Mexican Cooking by Diana Kennedy)(and a few chats with some panaderos– Mexican bakers)

for the starter
(about 2 1/2 hours)
450 g unbleached flour
60 g evaporated cane juice (or cane sugar)
10 g instant yeast
3 whole eggs (150 g) at room temperature*
75 mL water at at 30°C
75 mL (5TBS) whole milk at 30°C
10 g salt

for the final dough
(mix final dough: 20 minutes; first fermentation: 1 1/2 hours; pre-shape, rest and shape: 30 minutes; final proof: 3-3 1/2 hours; baking time: 30 minutes)
all of the starter
450 g unbleached flour
75 mL (5 TBS) whole milk at 30°C
8 large egg yolks (160g) at room temperature*
grated zest of two oranges
grated zest of one Mexican lemon (green lime)
225 g evaporated cane juice (or cane sugar)
200 g unsalted butter, softened
70 g golden raisins, soaked in hot water
50 g each of candied orange and lemon, soaked in hot water and chopped

for the costrón
100 g butter
90 g powdered sugar**
90 g unbleached flour

for the topping
Candied fruits (orange, lemon, cherries are traditional… but figs, kiwis, etc work perfectly as well)
1 egg, lightly beaten for egg wash

In the bowl of a stand mixer with a dough hook, add all of the starter ingredients and mix until the dough forms a smooth elastic mass around the dough hook (about 10 minutes). If working by hand, mix all ingredients in a bowl first, transfer into a well-floured surface and knead for 10-15 minutes until smooth. Transfer to a well-buttered bowl, cover with cling film and leave in a warm place until doubled in size (about 2 hours).

To the fermented starter add the remaining flour, egg yolks, milk, orange and lemon zest, and sugar. Mix with the dough hook on low speed until combined (about 4 minutes) or with a wooden spoon. It will be stiff, but refrain from adding any extra liquid.

Turn the mixer to medium speed and continue mixing until the dough reaches almost full gluten development. If working by hand, you will want to add the butter now little by little to make it easier to work. The dough will be quite sticky.

When working with a mixer, add the butter and mix in low speed for a minute or two, then in medium speed until the butter is fully incorporated into the dough. If working by hand, you will be kneading for about 20 minutes (stretching the dough away from you, folding it back and rotating 90-degrees), until smooth and elastic.

Turn the mixer back to low speed and add the fruit, mixing until just incorporated. By hand, pat the dough unto a rectangular shape, sprinkle the fruit, fold and knead a few times.Transfer the dough to a lightly buttered large bowl, cover with cling film and ferment for 1.5 hours at room temperature.

Turn the dough into a lightly floured surface and divide into two pieces. Shape each piece into a ball and let rest, covered with a clean cloth, for 20 minutes.

Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. For each rosca, lengthen into a coil and with a rolling pin flatten (focusing on stretching it lengthwise). Distribute the figurines, and begin to roll it away from you (width wise)- trapping the figurines and leaving you with a long coil of dough. Form into a round (or slightly rectangular shape), opening one of the ends and placing the other inside of it to seal. (As shown in this video). Transfer to the prepared baking sheets and proof, covered in cling film and a towel, for about 3 hours or until almost doubled in size.

For the costrón, mix together the butter, powdered sugar and flour until a soft paste forms. Let rest for 30 minutes before using.

Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F). Before baking brush the dough with the egg wash, decorate with the candied fruit and place the costrones on the four corners (take a piece of the mixture and shape it into a flat rectangular form). Bake for 25-30 minutes (covering with aluminium foil after 15 minutes if getting too brown).

Allow to cool completely on a rack before cutting.

Roscas are very much like panettone in that they keep well when kept in sealed plastic bags, refreshing in the oven just before eating (they are always better slightly warm!).

* When using organic eggs (which I highly suggest), they might run a bit (or a lot!) smaller than your average egg- so do try to weigh them as there can be a substantial difference (e.g. one time I used 9 egg yolks instead of 8).

** I make my own powdered sugar by running evaporated cane juice (or organic cane sugar) through the blender until powdered.

makes 2 x 1 kg roscas

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bacalao (salted cod) http://www.gnom-gnom.com/bacalao-salted-cod-recipe/ http://www.gnom-gnom.com/bacalao-salted-cod-recipe/#comments Wed, 26 Dec 2012 21:03:21 +0000 http://www.gnom-gnom.com/?p=852     bacalao (salted cod). Bacalao (salted cod), is a dish traditionally served in Mexico (and Spain) during the Christmas to New Year period and one of my all-time-favourite dishes without a doubt (and if you know me, this is saying a lot!). I remember Christmas after Christmas as a kid sitting with my mother …

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bacalao-(salted-cod)-recipe-_-ThePvdHJournal
 
bacalao-(salted-cod)-recipe-_-ThePvdHJournal-2
 
bacalao (salted cod). Bacalao (salted cod), is a dish traditionally served in Mexico (and Spain) during the Christmas to New Year period and one of my all-time-favourite dishes without a doubt (and if you know me, this is saying a lot!). I remember Christmas after Christmas as a kid sitting with my mother (and company) to shred the cod. Eagerly anticipating it (even more so than the turkey).

It is time consuming yes, but worth every bit of the work. This is my grandmother’s recipe, a take on the Spanish bacalao a la vizcaína. It really is a very special recipe, and one of the dishes she came to be known for throughout her lifetime. Her ‘secret’ was to shred the cod as thinly as possible (instead of leaving it in chunks), and to subsequently fry it in small batches. Hers was also dry, rather than ‘soupy’, so it makes for killer leftover sandwiches (even if you are a coeliac like myself, still make an effort to find a good gluten free bread).

And what to do if the bacalao turns out a bit too salty? It happens sometimes if you do not de-salt it enough in the previous days. You can add more potatoes and have them ‘soak up’ the extra salt. It really does the trick.

And, this may sound cocky (but I’ll risk it anyways), let me tell you that doing the bacalao this way really does result in one of the best bacalaos I’ve had (if not the best one). And I haven’t been the only judge of this.


Bacalao (salted cod)
Author: 
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: Mexican
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 6-8
 
Ingredients
  • 800 g (1.8 lb) dried and salted Norwegian cod
  • 75 mL (5 TBS) grapeseed oil (or cooking oil of choice)
  • 13 medium garlic cloves, peeled
  • 1 large onion (380 g), finely chopped
  • 15 g parsley, finely chopped plus extra for serving
  • 900 g (32 oz) tomato puree
  • 400 g (14 oz) small potatoes, boiled
  • 60 g (2 oz)_almonds, blanched
  • 150 g (5.3 oz) manzanilla olives, pited
  • 120 g (4.2 oz) guindilla chile (chile largo) in vinegar, drained and whole
  • 5-8 pimientos del piquillo (sweet red Spanish peppers) in salted water, sliced to serve (optional)
Instructions
  1. The cod must be de-salted and rehydrated before cooking. To do so, place cod in a bowl and cover with water. Change water 3 times a day for 3 days.
  2. Once rehydrated, the key to the success of this dish is to shred (dezmenuzar) the cod as finely as possible (discarding the skin and bones). You want to end up cod ‘hairs’- aka extremely fine strands. A well-worth pain.
  3. To cook, heat the oil in a good frying pan and fry the garlic cloves until golden in low heat. Once golden, squeeze the cloves with a wooden spoon, take out and discard. Add the onion into the garlic infused oil and sautee until golden brown, squeeze and drain the onion as you did with the cloves, remove from the pan and reserve. Add the parsley to the garlic and onion infused oil and simmer for a few minutes, drain as you did with the garlic and onion and reserve.
  4. Pour the garlic, onion and parsley infused oil into a small bowl (you will be frying the flaked cod in five batches). Add ⅕ of the oil to the frying pan and ⅕ of the cod, fry (stirring constantly) until golden brown and slightly crispy. Repeat with the five batches.
  5. Place the fried cod, reserved onions and parsley into the frying pan and begin to incorporate the tomato puree little by little. The bacalao should in no way be ‘soupy’ nor dry, so adjust the amount of the puree accordingly. Incorporate the potatoes (peeled or unpeeled), almonds, olives, and guindilla chiles. Season according to taste. Just before serving incorporate some roughly chopped parsley.
  6. Bacalao is best prepared the day before (to accentuate the flavours), and can be served both warm and cold.
  7. (And it is pretty incredible as a sandwich with this olive bread).
Notes
Investing in the best quality bacalao (salted cod) you can find will really make a difference in the end result.

Also, I prefer to pretty much completely 'desalt' the cod during the first three days, and once cooking season to taste with good quality salt (such as Maldon)

And what to do if the bacalao turns out a bit too salty? It happens sometimes if you do not de-salt it enough in the previous days. You can add more potatoes and have them 'soak up' the extra salt. It really does the trick.

 

 

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(pretty easy) olive bread http://www.gnom-gnom.com/olive-bread-recipe/ http://www.gnom-gnom.com/olive-bread-recipe/#comments Wed, 26 Dec 2012 18:02:35 +0000 http://www.gnom-gnom.com/?p=830   (pretty easy) olive bread. OK, so making your own bread at home is never easy per say. But if I were to classify a yeasted bread into such a category, this one would be it. No mixer is even required (though feel free to use it). Fact is, if you follow a few (rather …

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olive bread | gnom-gnom.com
 
(pretty easy) olive bread. OK, so making your own bread at home is never easy per say. But if I were to classify a yeasted bread into such a category, this one would be it. No mixer is even required (though feel free to use it).

Fact is, if you follow a few (rather foolproof) guidelines, the result will be pretty incredible. I pretty much just love (good) bread (who doesn’t really?), and this is one of my favourites.

Fill it with olives (kalamatas are my pick), through in some rosemary, add garlic, remove the olives and add some toasted fennel seeds (which makes it a fennel + olive oil bread, I’m fully aware)… the possibilities are pretty much endless. And if we are talking maths, and begin to think in terms of permutations, you really can get quite a few upping your creativity.

My point is- this is a very versatile bread.

I like to add some whole wheat flour, but feel free to make it all white. Oh, and don’t forget to use great quality (pitted!) olives- you will taste the difference.

 

olive bread
(loosely based on this one)

325 g (2 1/2 cups) unbleached hard white flour
65 g (1/2 cup) whole wheat flour
2 tsp active dry yeast
1 TBS sugar
295 mL (1 1/4 cup) water at 35-38°C (95-100°F)
3 TBS olive oil + extra for greasing and brushing
2 tsp fine sea salt
1/2 cup olives, coarsely chopped

Proof the yeast with the water and sugar, cover with cling film and set aside for 10 minutes until active.

Whisk together the two flours, add the yeast mixture and mix together with a wooden spoon. Mix in the salt, olive oil and olives. Turn out the dough onto a well floured surface and knead until it is smooth and elastic (about 10 minutes). Place on a well oiled bowl, cover in cling film and let rest until it doubles in size (about 45 minutes).

Punch down the dough and knead well again (about 8 minutes). Place back into bowl (might want to oil it before once again), and let rise until doubled in size (about 30 minutes).

Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured surface and round. Place it upside down in a bowl lined with a well-floured linen (or kitchen towel). Let rise until doubled in size.

Meanwhile, place a pan of water in the bottom of the oven (to create a good crust). Preheat the oven to 220°C (430°F).

Turn out loaf (with extreme care!) onto baking stone or sheet, brush with olive oil and bake for 15 minutes at 230°C (450°F). Reduce temperature to 190°C (375°F) and bake for 30 minutes more.

Allow to cool completely on a rack.

makes 1 loaf

 

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